THE ROLE OF MOOC IN UNIVERSITY’S LEADERSHIP STRATEGY

  • Danguole Rutkauskiene E-Learning Technology centre, Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania
  • Daina Gudoniene Research Laboratory, Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania
Keywords: OERs, MOOCs, pedagogical approach, methodological approach, higher education, challenges

Abstract

The paper presents the situation of transformation in higher education, which driven by the rising interest in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). MOOCs seen as transformation drivers in all levels of education and are very important to lead in education sector. However, this transformation comes with the new challenges for higher education. Higher education institutions must revise current and offer new ways of course design and delivery as well as to adapt a learning process according to the new challenges. The Lithuanian case presented in this paper.

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References

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Published
2015-12-24
How to Cite
Rutkauskiene, D., & Gudoniene, D. (2015). THE ROLE OF MOOC IN UNIVERSITY’S LEADERSHIP STRATEGY. International Scientific Journal of Universities and Leadership, (1), 21-24. Retrieved from https://ul-journal.org/index.php/journal/article/view/3
Section
THE DEVELOPMENT OF LEADERSHIP POTENTIAL OF UNIVERSITIES